The Last week of play. What to watch for.

For spectators of the political Olympics, we’re now in the final sprint, the last leg, indeed the gold medal round of the competition to shape the 41st Parliament.

We’ve seen some surprises, some upsets and some tears among the competitors.

Jack Layton, the scrappy underdog, is on his way to a personal best and new team record if his current momentum holds. His main competition released a barrage of hits against him this weekend calling him an unprincipled career politician. The Liberals have been billing themselves as good sports but they’ve been throwing a few low blows of late. Word is, the old coach of the Grits, one Jean Chrétien, a 40 year career hall-of-famer in his own right, will be on the bench and will be wrapping his gloves around the neck of any oncomer that comes to challenge rookie Iggy “the Professor” Ignatieff.

The relative inexperience of the Liberal challenger has been evident in round-robin competition up to now.

Meanwhile, later this week, gameplay will be interrupted by the British Royal wedding. Look for competitors to regroup in Quebec where fans of both Brits and marriage are in relative short supply. Indeed, while English Canada is tuning into the nuptials of Wills and Kate, Quebecers will be getting a better look at Gilles, Jaques and Stephen. Layton will continue to bill himself as the hometown hero in Montreal as the Habs continue their playoff run. Duceppe will focus his fire on the new challenger to the socialist crown in the nation. Of late, the sovereignist slugger has been flailing as his gameplan has come up short. La crie finale of the Bloc will appeal to Quebecers and their identity instead of their issues.

Stephen Harper will continue to skate easy as team Grit and team Dip battle it out for the silver. To help firm up the NDP vote where it counts for the Conservatives against the Liberals, watch for additional polarizing plays by the Conservatives against the New Democrats. A strong frontal attack against Layton will rally the orange jerseys and prevent them from switching teams in the last round. Harper, the champion of the last round and favourite to win this match, owes much of his success to years of disciplined training, a strong record, and trash-talking of the Liberal challenger in the off-season. Facing a much weakened Liberal team in the final round, look for Harper to square-off against the Liberals, Dippers and Bloc as a tag-team coalition, and a desperate, reckless and unstable one at that.

While keeping an eye on gameplay on the field, watch for fans to boo the officiators of this Canadian political grudge match as election referees focus attention on rule breakers in the stands threatening the peace with their tweets and wall posts. A wave of civil disobedience will start among the spectators as they pass on the score to spectators suffering under blackout conditions.

As we wrap up competition in the games of the 41st political Olympiad the biggest question will remained unanswered until the last minute of competition as we finish tallying the score: will we hold the next political Olympics in four years?

Game Changer

They’ve been popping organic champagne corks in the NDP war room this week as poll after poll is showing that party ahead of the Liberals in a race for second place.

The surge of the NDP seems to be most pronounced in Quebec where there are certainly more than a few former NDP staffers, thinking they were taking one for the team, who may yet find themselves with seats in the House of Commons come May 3rd.

The larger effect of all of this is of course the psychological block experienced by many on the left regarding cheating on their idealism to act pragmatic. For those that have traditionally held their nose voting Liberal to “stop Harper”, this week has been a game changer for the NDP.

What happened? Jack Layton gave phenomenal back-to-back performances in the debates. Walking into this campaign, with the visible assistance of a cane, reporters had asked him how his health would fare during a grueling 35 days while leaders crisscross the country on an intense schedule. Instead, we’ve learned that Layton may toss his cane aside by election day.

Indeed, Layton now appears to be dancing circles around the Liberal campaign led by a leader many in the press expected to do better given lower expectations set by 2 years of negative advertising against him. Instead, the Harvard professor was schooled by Layton in the moment of the English language leaders debate that was the closest thing we saw to a “knock-out blow” in those two nights. Called out for his poor attendance record, Layton asked rhetorically how Michael Ignatieff could speak convincingly on democracy if he didn’t show up for votes in the Commons.

Many leftwing voters are now asking how Ignatieff can represent their views if he’s not present for votes. And as we’re seeing in the polls, many wonder if Ignatieff can do much to stop a majority Conservative government.

The other fatal blunder for Ignatieff this week came during an interview with CBC’s Peter Mansbridge when the Liberal leader admitted that regarding a coalition, Mr. Harper could try to form government yet if he could not command the confidence of the House, Mr. Ignatieff would try to form a government with the support of the other parties, including the Bloc Quebecois. Yet most Canadians are more grounded than Ignatieff appeared to be during that interview. It is widely understood that such cooperation would come with concessions to any partner that would support the second-place Liberals in the formation of a new government. And while Mr. Ignatieff is willfully ignorant that such concessions would relate to cabinet, Canadians remember the last time the Liberals negotiated a scenario for taking power without the support of the majority or plurality of the electorate.

Canadians are going into the Easter weekend tomorrow with a few truths to consider. First and foremost, Stephen Harper will be the next Prime Minister. Second, if Michael Ignatieff cannot be counted on to stop Stephen Harper from forming a majority, left-leaning Canadians will look to the much more likable and ideological Jack Layton to oppose Mr. Harper in the 41st parliament. Third, Canadians will consider a coalition government to be explicitly on the table as Layton may be in an increased position of strength to negotiate its outcome.

Statement by Brad Wall on Michael Ignatieff

I am deeply troubled by Mr. Ignatieff’s assertion that he may choose to overturn the democratic result of the federal election.

While I understand that the scenario spelled out by Mr. Ignatieff is within the conventions of our Parliamentary tradition, the last thing our country and our still fragile economic recovery need right now is a period of instability caused by a constitutional dispute over who should be the government.

Morever, Canada is poised to solidify its position as an economic leader in a world that needs the food security and the energy security we can provide.  How can we take full advantage of this reality if we are distracted by interminable national political machinations and constitutional wrangling?

The party that wins the most seats on May 2 should be recognized as the government, period.  If that were to be the Liberals, I would join with other Canadians in accepting this result and recognizing Mr. Ignatieff as our next Prime Minister.  However, if the Conservatives win the most seats but come up short of a majority, I would expect Mr. Ignatieff and his party to accept that result.

The notion that Mr. Ignatieff may choose to not recognize the democratic result of the election and may try to seize power with the support of the other parties, including a party dedicated to the breakup of Canada, is offensive to me and I believe, to most fair-minded Canadians. Voters should choose the government, not separatist MPs.

Ironically, this election was caused by a confidence vote over “contempt for Parliament.”  I can think of no greater contempt for Parliament or for Canadian voters than the spectre of a party leader refusing to recognize the democratic outcome of the election.

Getting to the fundamentals

If greed is universal, we can break down our approach in two distinct categories.

On the left, we look at relative prosperity, see the glass as too full, and take from others.

On the right, we look at our own prosperity, see the glass as half full, and make for others.

On the left we have the redistribution of wealth as we look to others and covet.

On the right we have the production of wealth as we look to others to please.

If helping is universal, we can break down our approach in two distinct categories.

On the left, socialism is charity without consent.

On the right, philanthropy is charity without coercion.

Danielle Smith endorses federal Conservative majority government

I heard this morning that Alberta Wildrose Alliance leader Danielle Smith was endorsing Stephen Harper so I wanted to confirm.

20110409-111144.jpg

Confirmed the old-fashioned way… via SMS!

This is an interesting move for Smith. How does the political capital equation add up for this move?

Simple…

There aren’t many (if any) federal Liberals/NDPers in her camp and if there are, the trade-off is bigger. Stelmach is conflicted as Premier and his office won’t endorse a candidate because the Premier must work with the Feds no matter who is elected. But many Albertans are ardent federal Conservative supporters and view their current provincial government as a wishy-washy version of an ideal. Smith is suggesting to her fellow Albertans indirectly by her endorsement that the real conservative alternative is her as Premier and her party as government.

Canadian ads and the latest process story scandal

The Conservatives put out a new ad yesterday called “Our Country”. The Liberals rapid-response desk in their war-room put together this video to suggest common elements between the ad and one by GOP 2012 nomination hopeful Tim Pawlenty. Here’s their video comparing the two:

But the Liberals have done it too with their recent advertising. Take a look at this ad from Barack Obama. The Liberal Party ad which is similar follows after it in the video:

What follows is the most humourous derivate effort of any of these ads. And, while it’s a bit of a funny remix of the Conservative Party ad, it’s not that far off message!

A quick glance over at the MSM this evening…

I’m arching and furrowing my blow at this in a way that would make Ignatieff envious…

@RosieBarton

“The politics of hope will beat the politics of fear everytime” Iggy. #elxn41 (sorta obamaesque)

@JaneTaber1

Ig doing some obama fist-bumping with supporters; seventh rally. Hasn’t been to NB or PEI yet – and we’re off to QC tomorrow

What do you do when hope is ambition and change comes with a Bloc veto?

Peter Stoffer and his votes against military families

Jack Layton was in Dartmouth, Nova Scotia yesterday touting a plan to help veterans. NDP MP Peter Stoffer is an NDPer in Nova Scotia running for re-election who is often touted as the NDP’s pro-military MP. Here is a list of his votes and absences that neglected the interests of military personnel and their families.

Here is the list from 2009.  I’m looking to add new information to this list if you have more send me an email.

On March 24th, 2009 Peter Stoffer voted against: 
(Supplementary (C) year ending March 31, 2009)

  • $35 million for increase to the grants for Disability Awards and Allowances
  • $240 thousand in funding to the Commonwealth War Graves Commission
  • $175 thousand for the Children of Deceased Veterans Education Assistance – Funding to provide assistance for higher education for children of certain deceased members of the armed forces
  • $154 thousand for outreach programs to promote the Atomic Veterans Recognition Program
On February 12th, 2009 Peter Stoffer Voted Against: 
(Supplementary (B) year ending March 31, 2009)

  • $331 million in funding for Canada’s mission in Afghanistan
  • $90.4 million for increases to pay and allowances for Canadian Forces Members
  • $54.6 million in funding for the implementation phase of the Halifax Class frigate modernization and life extension project
  • $22.4 million for funding for Communication Security Establishment investment in technology infrastructure and to sustain essential operational capacities
  • $9.7 million for funding for ex-gratia payments to eligible applicants under the Atomic Veterans Recognition Program
On June 5, 2008 Peter Stoffer voted against: 
(Supplementary (A) year ending March 31, 2009)

  • $557.3 million In funding advanced for the major capital equipment project ensuring tactical airlift capability
  • $120 million in funding for the land duty allowance
  • $5.7 million in funding for the establishment and expansion of the Canada Police Research Centre
  • $29 Million in Funding to provide Veterans Independence Program (VIP) housekeeping and grounds maintenance services to low income or disabled survivors of War Veteran clients who were not in receipt of VIP services when they died
Main Estimates for year ending March 31, 2009
  • $18,293,756,000 in defence funding
  • $3,397,676,000 in Veterans’ funding
On March 12, 2008 Peter Stoffer voted against: 
(Supplementary (B) year ending March 31 2008)

  • $90,000 in payments to dependants of certain members of the Royal Canadian Air Force killed while serving as instructors
  • $957 Million for contributions to employee benefit plans for Members of the Military
  • $88.7 Million to Increases to pay and allowances for Canadian Forces Members
  • $6.7 Million for construction of an Aircraft Ready Shelter – 14 Wing Greenwood
  • $4.3 Million for Belly Armour Kits for the M113 Fleet – Operation ATHENA to protect our soldiers.
  • $15.7 Million in funding for the provision of home care for Veterans and qualified primary caregivers, and for intermediate care for Veterans in community facilities.
  • $3.3 Million in funding for the capital requirements for Ste. Anne’s Hospital which provide Veterans with a wide range of programs and with a continuum of high quality care, while respecting their dignity and autonomy.
  • $657 thousand Funding to the Commonwealth War Graves Commission
  • One Million dollars for funding to provide assistance for higher education for children of certain deceased members of the armed forces
On December 6, 2007 Peter Stoffer voted against: 
(Supplementary (A) year ending March 31 2008)

  • $875 Million Funding to strengthen the Canadian Forces’ independent capacity to defend Canada’s national sovereignty and security (Canada First)
  • $340 Million Funding for Canada’s military mission in Afghanistan
  • $162 Million Funding advanced for major capital equipment projects including airlift capability (strategic and tactical), battle tank replacement, and howitzers
  • $131 Million Funding to acquire main battle tanks for the Canadian Forces
  • $49 Million Funding to extend the life of the Halifax Class frigates
  • $24 Million Funding to relocate the Joint Task Force 2
  • $14.4 Million Funding to acquire Arctic/offshore patrol ships
  • $10 Million Funding related to government advertising programs (horizontal item)
  • $181 Thousand Funding in support of the Federal Accountability Act to evaluate all ongoing grant and contribution programs every five years (horizontal item
  • $14.8 Million Nova Scotia – 12 Wing Common Support Facility – 12 Wing Shearwater, Canadian Forces Base Halifax
  • $13.9 Million Nova Scotia – 12 Air Maintenance Squadron Facility – 12 Wing Shearwater, Canadian Forces Base Halifax
  • $12.5 Million Nova Scotia – 423 (Maritime Helicopter) Squadron Facility – 12 Wing Shearwater, Canadian Forces Base Halifax
  • $9.2 million Nova Scotia – Syncrolift Facility Upgrade – Canadian Forces Base Halifax
  • $548 thousand New Brunswick – Replace Fire Hall – 14 Wing Greenwood
  • $583 thousand New Brunswick – Garage for the new fleet of fuel supply vehicles – 14 Wing Greenwood
  • $656 thousand Quebec – Rationalize Transport and Electrical and Mechanical Engineering Infrastructure – 3 Wing Bagotville
  • $2.6 million for Quebec – Re-accommodate 425 Tactical Fighter Squadron and 3 Air Maintenance Squadron – 3 Wing Bagotville
  • $623 Million Quebec – Construction of a building to house the Land Force Quebec Area, Command Support Capability – Montreal Garrison
  • $24 million Ontario – Joint Task Force 2 Relocation – Canadian Forces Base Trenton
  • $29 million Ontario – Reconstruction of taxiways, recapitalization and expansion of the northeast ramp – 8 Wing Trenton
  • $9 million for Ontario – Joint Task Force 2 – Special Operations Tactical Training Centre – Canadian Forces Base Petawawa
  • $7.8 million for Alberta – Upgrade Utilities and Roads – 4 Wing Cold Lake
  • $781 thousand for British Columbia – Construct Single Quarters – 19 Wing Comox
  • $1.2 million for British Columbia – Construct Combined Mess and Kitchen – 19 Wing Comox Equipment
  • $14.4 million for an Arctic/Offshore Patrol Ship
  • $131 million for the Acquisition of main battle tanks for the Canadian Forces
  • $55.1 million for  CF-18 Defensive Electronic Warfare Suite Project
  • $32.1 million for Land Force Intelligence, Surveillance, Target Acquisition and Reconnaissance Omnibus Project – Data Link Communication Sub-project
  • $32.8 million for Additional Mounted Soldier Survivability Project in Support of Operation ATHENA
  • $6 million for Air Force Omnibus Support Vehicles Replacement Project
  • $11 million for Canadian Forces Explosive Ordnance Disposal Team Equipment Project
  • $24.2 million for Temperate Combat Boot, a sub-project of the Clothe the Soldier Omnibus Project
  • $10.5 million for Converged Rain Suit, a sub-project of the Clothe the Soldier Omnibus Project
  • $9.6 million for Expedient Route Opening Capability Project
  • $4 million for Defence Learning Network
  • $2.6 million for Fragmentation Protective Vest, a sub-project of the Clothe the Soldier Omnibus Project
  • $10.2 million for Land Force Intelligence, Surveillance, Target Acquisition and Reconnaissance – Lightweight Counter-Mortar Radar Sub-Project
  • $4.2 million for Chemical, Biological, Radiological and Nuclear Sensor Integration and Decision Support Project, a sub-project of the Chemical, Biological, Radiological and Nuclear Defence Omnibus Project
  • $8.6 million for Mounted Soldier Survivability: Crew Vision Enhancement
  • $6.8 million for Mounted Soldier Survivability : Exposed Crew Protective Equipment
  • $5.6 million for Combat Vehicle Crew Modular Helmet, a sub-project of the Clothe the Soldier Omnibus Project
  • $10.5 million for Mounted Soldier Survivability: Non-lethal Laser Dazzler
  • $7.46 million for Mounted Soldier Survivability: Exposed Crew Protection Kit – Turret
  • $7.8 million for Mounted Soldier Survivability: Add-on-Armour for the Light Armoured Vehicle Remote Weapon System
  • $300 thousand for Mobile Aircraft Arrestor System Replacement Project
  • $4.1 million for Mounted Soldier Survivability: Exposed Crew Protection Kit – Sentry
  • $4.5 million for Tactical Vehicles
  • $195 thousand for Multi-effects Carl Gustaf (84MM) Ammunition
  • $500 thousand Bus Cruisers
  • $1.9 million for Truck Maintenance Line Construction Medium Duty
  • $80 thousand for Command-Wire Detector
  • $934 thousand for Air Combat Manoeuvring Instrumentation and Surface Threat Electronic Warfare systems Enhancements
  • $2.7 million for Material Handling Equipment (Forklifts)
  • $770 thousand  for Air Transportable Refuelling Supply Vehicles
  • $141 thousand  for IROQUOIS class Separate track Illuminating Radar Low Elevation Search
  • $454 thousand Very High Frequency (VHF) Transmission System
  • $700 thousand for Excavators
  • $1 million for Highway Cruiser Recapitalization
  • $257 thousand for Increase of Inventory AN/SQJ 501 Active Shaft Grounding Equipment
  • $9 million to Construct Semi-Permanent Accommodation for Support Personnel at Kandahar
  • $15 million for Classified Security Management Infrastructure Project
  • $4.3 million for Ballistic Curtains – Operation ATHENA
  • $1 million for Tactical Common Data Link Ground Station
  • $19.9 million for ex gratia payments to deliver on the Government’s commitments related to Agent Orange testing at CFB Gagetown in 1966 and 1967
  • $15 million for Funding to strengthen services to veterans and their families by enhancing services to Veterans’ Family Support Network, establishing five Operational Stress Injury Clinics and improving timeliness of services and benefits for clients
  • $4.6 million for Funding for the establishment of the Office of the Veterans’ Ombudsman and a Veterans’ Bill of Rights
  • $1.2 million in Funding to honour Canada’s military heroes through the commemoration of the 90th anniversary of the Battle of Vimy Ridge
  • $400 thousand funding for the restoration of Canada’s World War I European monuments
March 22nd 2007 – Supplementary Estimates (B) for year ending March 31, 2007 – Was agreed to on division 

November 28th 2006 – Supplementary Estimates (A) for year ending March 31, 2007 – Was agreed to on division

November 28th 2005 – Supplementary Estimates (A) for year ending March 31, 2006 – House has lost confidence in the government

UNABLE TO FIND VOTE – Supplementary Estimates (B) for year ending March 31, 2005

December 9th 2004 Peter Supplementary Estimates (A) for year ending March 31, 2005 – Was agreed to on division

UNABLE TO FIND VOTE – Supplementary Estimates (B) for year ending March 31, 2004

On October 28th 2003 Peter Stoffer voted against: MND also voted against
(Supplementary Estimates (A) year ending March 31, 2004)

  • $792 million in funding to address core operational and capital requirements
  • $387 million for the International Security Assistance Force Mission to Afghanistan
  • $1.314 Billion in defence funding, including $171 Million for personnel
  • $17 million in Incremental funding for renovations of Ste. Anne’s Hospital
  • $22.5 million in Increased requirements for Disability Pensions

On March 25th 2003 Peter Stoffer voted against: MND also voted against
(Supplementary Estimates (B) year ending March 31, 2003)

  • $613 thousand for Army Global Positioning System Equipment Replacement
  • $37.5 Million for Wheeled Light Armoured Vehicle Life Extension
  • $685 thousand for Advanced Lightweight Anti-Armour Weapon System
  • $4.8 Million for High Frequency Surface Wave Radar Upgrade
  • $1.5 million for Canadian Disruptive Pattern for Arid Regions – Additional Clothing and Equipment Accessories
  • $7.3 million for the Bedford Ammunition Transit and Maintenance Facilities
  • $1.5 million for Performance Oriented Electronic Training – Expansion Building Complex (Kingston)
  • $6.3 million for the Canadian Forces Health Information System
  • $5.3 million for the Recapitalization of dormitories – Royal Military College (Kingston)
  • $9 million for Pensions for disability and death, including pensions granted under the authority of the Civilian Government Employees (War) Compensation Order, P.C. 45/8848 of November 22, 1944, which shall be subject to the Pension Act; for compensation for former prisoners of war under the Pension Act, and Newfoundland special awards
  • $600 thousand for War Veterans Allowances and Civilian War Allowances
  • $300 thousand for the Commonwealth War Graves Commission
  • $7.4 million in Contributions to veterans, under the Veterans Independence Program, to assist in defraying costs of extended health care not covered by provincial health programs
On December 5th 2002 Peter Stoffer voted against: MND also voted against 
(Supplementary Estimates (A) year ending March 31, 2003)

  • $135 million for Pay comparability for Canadian Forces and pay adjustments and environmental allowances for officers and non-commissioned members
  • $49 million Public security and anti-terrorism initiatives
  • $5.8 million for High Speed Data Connectivity
  • $1.7 million for Maritime Communications Data Link 22 Phase III Project
  • $4 Million for Heavyweight Torpedo – Self-Noise Quieting Modification
  • $1.3 million for Handheld Thermal Imager
  • $4 million for Joint Space Support
  • $43.8 million for CF-18 Multi-purpose Display Group Project
  • $400 thousand for Force Protection Vessel
  • $6.8 million for Nuclear, Biological and Chemical Defence Services
  • $2.8 million for Lightweight Thermal Glove
  • $960 thousand for Temperate Underwear
  • $3.2 million for Millennium Standard Light Weight Combat Clothing
  • $7.6 million for the Citadelle de Québec – ASU Valcartier
  • $9.4 million for CTS – Desert Combat Clothing and Equipment
  • $11.7 million for the Omnibus Project – Cadet Summer Training Centre Infrastructure (CSTC) and New Permanent Soft-Walled Structures at 6 CSTC’s
  • $5.9 million for CFB Shilo – 2PPCLI Garrison Facility Recapitalization Construction Project
  • $18.2 million for CFB 17 Wing – Winnipeg Recapitalization Construction Project
  • $2.7 million for Hangar 16 Roof Repairs 17 Wing – Winnipeg
  • $600 thousand for VHF Replacement and RHIB VHF Fitting
  • $2.5 million to Renovate K-17 Maintenance Tank Hangar – CTC Gagetown
  • $1.5 million to Upgrade Sanitary and Storm Sewer Syst. – CFB/ASU Edmonton
  • $800 thousand for the Midlife Retro-Fit Building J101 – CFB/ASU Petawawa
  • $2 million for the Forward area Refueller POL (petroleum, oil, lubricant) Trailer
  • $600 thousand for 410 Squadron Ground Based Training System Courseware
  • $4.6 million for the Victoria Class Naval Combat Operator Trainer Module
  • $4.9 million for the Victoria Class Submarine Command Team Trainer
  • $69.5 Million for CF-18 Advanced Distributed Combat Training System
  • $4.6 million for Defence Information Services Broker
  • $17 million for Additional requirements for Other Health Purchased Services
  • $8.6 million for Realignment of resources relating to Quality of Life
  • $92 million for Pensions for disability and death, including pensions granted under the authority of the Civilian Government Employees (War) Compensation Order,
On March 19th 2002 Peter Stoffer was absent for the vote on Supplementary Estimates (B) year ending March 31, 2002 

On December 4th 2001 Peter Stoffer voted against: MND also voted against
(Supplementary Estimates (A) year ending March 31, 2002)

  • $1.2 million for the Fire Fighter Trainer/Smoke Abatement, CFB Halifax (Sandwich Point)
  • $17 million for the Fleet Maintenance Facility (FMF) Cape Scott, Combat System Repair Facility, CFB Halifax
  • $4 million for HMCS Donnacona, Montreal, P.Q.
  • $2.6 million for the Recapitalization Construction – Victoria Class Shore Accommodation – CFB Esquimalt
  • $1.5 million for the Fire Fighter Trainer/Smoke Abatement CFB Esquimalt (Colwood)
  • $5.6 million for the New Water Supply and Distribution System – CFB Esquimalt
  • $1 million for the Kingston Class Accommodation Modules
  • $580 thousand for the SPAR SHINCOM 2100 Series Dual Switch AL 1
  • $8.6 million for a Central Power Systems
  • $3.8 million for a Small Pack System (Part of Omnibus)
  • $1 million for Ballistic Protective Visor (BPV) (Part of Omnibus)
  • $1 million for OP Palladium Fuel Storage Tanks
  • $31 million for Wheeled Light Armoured Vehicle Life Extension Project (WLAV LE)
  • $8.9 million for Armoured Vehicle General Purpose (AVGP) and Protected Weapons Stations (PWS)
  • $386 thousand for Canadian Forces Nuclear, Biological and Chemical (NBC) Decontamination Capability
  • $2.1 million to Upgrade Airfield Lighting – 5 Wing Goose Bay
  • $1.9 million to Construct ITAF Ramp 5 Wing Goose Bay
  • $1.3 million to Reconstruct Outer Edge Apron Area 17 Runway (H7 & 14) – 19 Wing Comox
  • $2.8 million for CP-140 Aurora – Military Airborne Collision Avoidance System II Acquisition
  • $4.6 million for AFCCIS Cycle 2 Implementation and Cycle 3 Definitions
  • $1.6 million for Aurora Electro-Optical System Replacement
  • $1 million for Sonobuoy Test Processor Replacement
  • $2.7 million for the Restoration of the Vimy monument and other European monuments
  • $34.5 million in Payments to Merchant Navy veterans
  • $570 thousand for Renovation of Ste. Anne de Bellevue Veterans Hospital

On March 20th 2001 Peter Stoffer voted against: MND also voted against
(Supplementary Estimates (A) year ending March 31, 2001)

  • $250 thousand to Replace B Jetty – Esquimalt
  • $1.7 million for Biological Agent Detector – Op Augmentation
  • $1.15 million for Halifax and Protecteur Class INMARSAT B F2 Satellite High Speed Data Capability
  • $780 thousand for  Halifax Class Accommodation Ladder Replacement
  • $3.5 million for Navy Winter Parka
  • $7 million for 408 Squadron – Edmonton
  • $1.6 million for Field Shower Replacement
  • $2 million for Renovation of MEGA kitchen – St-Jean
  • $1.45 million for Renovation to Building H-17 – Gagetown
  • $2.7 million for Extension of the CF Classified Command and Control Architecture to Land Force Units
  • $2.6 million for Improved Tank Ammunition
  • $4.2 million for Infrared laser Observation Set Replacement
  • $2.75 million for Leopard C2 Applique Turret Armour
  • $2.9 million Rangefinding Binoculars
  • $1.2 million for Weapon Effects Simulation (WES)
  • $1 million for Barrack Block 65 Renovation – Winnipeg
  • $1.8 million for Construct MP Facility – Cold Lake
  • $1.8 million for Construct Wing Accommodation Facility – Trenton
  • $4.3 million for Upgrade Municipal Infrastructure – 19 Wing Comox
  • $12.1 million for CC130 Aircraft Collision Avoidance System (ACAS)
  • $44.3 million for CF-18 Engineering Change proposal
  • $512 thousand for CH124A/B Sea King Multi-Band Radios
  • $3 million for Canadian Forces Joint Headquarters (CFJHQ)
  • $6.9 million for Re-locatable Temporary Camps
  • $379 thousand for CF NBC Decontamination System
  • $8.9 million for CF Nuclear Detection, Identification and Dosimetry Project
  • $1.9 million for Surveillance of Space (PPA)
  • $2.2 million for Canadian Forces Health Information System (CFHIS)
  • $4.2 million for UHF Military Satellite Communications Terminal
  • $1.2 million for Renovate Barrack Block (BLDG A150) – Borden
  • $1.76 million for Renovate BLDG E51 – Borden
  • $2.7 million to Replace Laterals PMQ area – Bagotville
  • $1.59 million to Reserve Accommodation – Borden
  • $2.38 million for Junior Ranks Mess Renovation Project – CFSU(O)(PPA)

On March 22nd 2000 Peter Stoffer voted against: MND also voted against
Supplementary Estimates (B) year ending March 31, 2000

  • $2.3 million for Shipboard Local Area Network, Phase 1
  • $2.7 million for Community Centre – CFB Valcartier
  • $300 thousand for Gym Renovation – WATC Wainwright
  • $130 thousand for Pool Renovation – CFB Edmonton
  • $1.1 million for Light Utility Vehicle (Wheeled) – LUVW
  • $1.3 million for Gym Renovation – 9 Wing Gander
  • $1.9 million for Search and Rescue Satellite Aided Tracking Repeaters
  • $205 million  for Additional requirements for equipment maintenance, upgrade and replacement
  • 59 million for Economic pay increase for Canadian Forces members and cash out of leave
  • 9.6 million for International peacekeeping operations
UNABLE TO FIND VOTE – Supplementary Estimates (A) for year ending March 31, 2000 

On March 16th 1999 Peter Stoffer was absent for the vote on Supplementary Estimates (C) year ending March 31, 1999

On December 1st 1998 Peter Stoffer voted against:
(Supplementary Estimates (B) for year ending March 31, 1999)

  • $4.4 million for Naval Reserve Division – Winnipeg
  • $1.5 million for Commander Task Group Systems Integration
  • $409 thousand for Direct Satellite Television Systems for Ships
  • $680 thousand for Naval Replenishment-at-sea Trainer
  • $1.5 million for Emergency Life Support Stores Pod System for Submarines
  • $740 thousand for Cryptologic Direct Support Element for Iroquois Class Naval Vessels
  • $2.5 million for Central Heating Plant, Lancaster Park – Edmonton
  • $2.2 million for Central Heating Plant, 7 CFSD – Edmonton
  • $6 million for 1 ASU Facilities – Edmonton
  • $770 thousand for Renovate Armoury – Trois Rivières
  • $18.1 million for Armoured Personnel Carriers
  • $3 million for Utilities Upgrade – Trenton
  • $900 thousand Hangar Extension – Gander
  • $1 million Tarmac Repairs – Winnipeg
  • $2.5 million Airfield Lighting Systems – Cold Lake
  • $1.75 million Water Supply Upgrade – Cold Lake
  • $2.6 million Upgrade 11 Hangar Ramp Space – Greenwood
  • $2.5 million POL Farm Replacement – Greenwood
  • $1.5 million Replace Boilers – Bagotville
  • $1.2 million Aviation Automatic Weather Observing System
  • $1.8 million Air Navigation Trainer
  • $3.3 million Command and Control Information System
  • $2 million New Facilities for the Dwyer Hill Training Centre
  • $1.8 million Mess and Training Facilities – Dwyer Hill
  • $2.4 million Facilities Consolidation – Toronto (PPA)
  • $1.7 million Facilities Consolidation – London (PPA)
  • $4.1 million ASU Facilities – Calgary
  • $3.9 million Materiel Acquisition and Support Information System (PPA)
  • $25.4 million in veteran’s affairs funding

UNABLE TO FIND VOTE – Supplementary Estimates (A) for year ending March 31, 1999

On March 17th 1998 Peter Stoffer voted against: MND also voted against
(Supplementary Estimates (B) year ending March 31, 1998)

  • $362 Thousand for Super High Frequency Satellite Communications
  • $1.7 Million for the St. Hubert – Renovate and Extend M2 Hangar
  • $1.9 million for Light Utility Vehicle – Wheeled
  • $925 thousand for Cold, Wet Weather Glove
  • $1.2 Million for the Greenwood – Replace 10 Hanger Roof
  • $21.1 million for Surface Threat Electronic Training Equipment
  • $200 thousand for CH 146 Griffon Door Gun Mounts
  • $4.1 million for Air Combat Manoeuvring Instrumentation
  • $735 thousand for 8 Air Communication and Control Squadron Modernization
  • $159.7 million in Contributions to the provinces for assistance related to natural disasters
  • $8 million for War Veterans Allowances and Civilian War Allowances
  • $20 million for Pensions for disability and death, including pensions granted under the authority of the Civilian Government Employees (War) Compensation Order